My summer reading list: Matthew Kenerly

kenerly-matthew-internet
Matthew Kenerly
Creative nonfiction, incoming

Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammer by Warren St. John — There may be no bigger Fresno State football enthusiast in the MFA Program than me, but I’m fully aware that my fandom has nothing on the obsessive, bordering on absurd, nature of college football fans in the South. This book focuses specifically on followers of the Alabama Crimson Tide, but I’m willing to bet I’ll find a thing or two in common with the RV brigade that St. John runs with across the region. Roll Tide.

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck — Yes, I’ll probably catch some flak for this entry, but Steinbeck is my homeboy and he understands why I haven’t gotten to his greatest work until now.

The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver — Silver is one of my personal heroes. Not only did he make his name in statistical projections for baseball, he also correctly predicted how each state would vote in the last presidential election and has become a pioneering name in the field of data journalism. This book is required reading for anyone who wants to successfully navigate our current information age.

Up, Up and Away: The Kid, The Hawk, Rock, Vladi, Pedro, le Grand Orange, Youppi!, the Crazy Business of Baseball, and the Ill-Fated but Unforgettable Montreal Expos by Jonah Keri — A decade after his beloved hometown team moved to Washington D.C., Keri, a Montreal native, took a deep dive into the franchise’s history and emerged with a pretty compelling narrative. I still say they would’ve won the World Series in 1994 had it not been cancelled.

Other books I hope to get to over the summer:
The Shining by Stephen King
Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West by Cormac McCarthy
When Pride Still Mattered: A Life of Vince Lombardi by David Maraniss

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One comment

  1. Hey Daniel, I’m on my second summer of trying to grok Kahneman’s Thinking Fast and Slow. Hoping to revisit it this summer myself, even though I have to put on my hip waders to get through it, and that’s with the convenient summaries at the end of each chapter. Maybe I’m just a Slow Thinker overall. I’d be interested to know what you take from it.

    Like

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